How to Recognize Implicit Bias After What Happened to Starbucks

A recent event at a coffee shop in Philadelphia has stirred controversy about subconscious bias, corporate policies, and how to repair a company’s fractured reputation.

In this article, I explain:

  • the facts behind this event (including quotes from the young men, Starbucks leaders, Philadelphia police and Mayor, and other experts)
  • What are Policies and Procedures?
  • When the Enforcement of Policy Shows an Underlying Bias
  • Starbucks’ Official Statement
  • Taking Action: What You Can Do to Prevent a Starbucks-Like Incident
  • The 7 Symptoms of Implicit Bias, and
  • My Conclusion

Continue reading “How to Recognize Implicit Bias After What Happened to Starbucks”

5 Painful Discussions That No Organization Should Ignore

This is the final in a 3-part series about Pain and Decision-Making.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

In previous posts, I described ways to see pain objectively, and how to identify pain points, and ways to fix them. In this article, we’ll be examining some difficult topics that most leaders tend to avoid.

Continue reading “5 Painful Discussions That No Organization Should Ignore”

How to Use Good and Bad Pain in Decision-Making

This is the second in a 3-part series about Pain and Decision-Making.

 

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

 

Although pain is usually viewed as harmful (“bad pain”), it can also help us (“good pain”). Let’s examine the useful kind.

Continue reading “How to Use Good and Bad Pain in Decision-Making”

What Happens When We Avoid Pain in Decision-Making?

Pain isn’t something most of us want to experience. We are hard-wired to avoid unpleasant conversations, experiences, and memories. And most of the time, this instinct serves us well.

But when it comes to recognizing risks — vulnerabilities and threats that could cause harm — avoiding pain is dangerous.

This is the first in a 3-part series about Pain and Decision-Making.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

In this post, I will review the basics of pain, our unique thresholds, corresponding fears, and how to evaluate and properly both pain and managing risk. Continue reading “What Happens When We Avoid Pain in Decision-Making?”

Yin and Yang and the 5 Risk Roles of Executive Leaders

Diversity, transparency, empathy.

When organizations welcome these qualities while maintaining structure and stability, they’re ahead of the game.

It is often difficult to find the right balance between an aggressive approach and a passive one when managing a business. In this article, I will describe the 5 types of risk, the 5 risk roles of executive leaders, and how these apply to balancing the Yin and Yang of Management.

Continue reading “Yin and Yang and the 5 Risk Roles of Executive Leaders”

[Video] Let’s Define… What are Blind Spots?

What are blind spots, and why do leaders struggle with them? In this Let’s Define episode, I will explain the 3 types of blind spots and how to overcome them.

Read my definition of Blind Spots

Watch the video, or read the transcript below:

Continue reading “[Video] Let’s Define… What are Blind Spots?”

What is Transaction Avoidance Syndrome? Part 3 of 3

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Evaluating your own professional worth can be very difficult. As mentioned in previous posts, our underlying discomfort with transactions can cause us to make long-lasting mistakes.

Even outwardly “successful” business owners often struggle with Imposter Syndrome: the fear that eventually, someone will find out we were faking it all along. As a practitioner, you may feel uncomfortable discussing costs with your customers. You might wonder when you’ll get paid but take extreme measures to avoid discussing the topic of money.

These are all signs of Transaction Avoidance.

Practical Solutions

If you are having trouble charging what you’re worth, here are some tips:

Continue reading “What is Transaction Avoidance Syndrome? Part 3 of 3”

What is Transaction Avoidance Syndrome? Part 2 of 3

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

A transaction is what happens at the end of a business exchange. The word comes from the Latin: trans- (“through”) and -agere (“to drive”).

As discussed in Part 1, many things can go wrong when we exchange payment for a service or product. A lot of us feel an underlying discomfort when we receive money.

This discomfort can look harmless at first. As a practitioner, you might spend “a few extra minutes” with each patient, or put off discussing payment options until the end of the visit. But the subconscious avoidance can have a very damaging effect on our business profitability.

Let’s take a look at why this happens.

Continue reading “What is Transaction Avoidance Syndrome? Part 2 of 3”