Why #MeToo Inspired Me to Be Transparent and Share My Failures

The following is my perspective on owning a business, experiencing trauma, and bringing my failures to light.

I used to hate the idea of sharing details about my personal life or business publicly, mostly because it’s not fun to get rejected by strangers. As an entrepreneur, my business and personal decisions are intertwined; so negative feedback about my company can feel like a personal attack.

Sometimes, it seems like everyone else is succeeding while you’re the only one struggling. But the truth is, we all face challenges of some sort. Most of us just don’t like to talk about it. Because being transparent is scary.

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Yin and Yang and the 5 Risk Roles of Executive Leaders

Diversity, transparency, empathy.

When organizations welcome these qualities while maintaining structure and stability, they’re ahead of the game.

It is often difficult to find the right balance between an aggressive approach and a passive one when managing a business. In this article, I will describe the 5 types of risk, the 5 risk roles of executive leaders, and how these apply to balancing the Yin and Yang of Management.

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What is Transaction Avoidance Syndrome? Part 3 of 3

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Evaluating your own professional worth can be very difficult. As mentioned in previous posts, our underlying discomfort with transactions can cause us to make long-lasting mistakes.

Even outwardly “successful” business owners often struggle with Imposter Syndrome: the fear that eventually, someone will find out we were faking it all along. As a practitioner, you may feel uncomfortable discussing costs with your customers. You might wonder when you’ll get paid but take extreme measures to avoid discussing the topic of money.

These are all signs of Transaction Avoidance.

Practical Solutions

If you are having trouble charging what you’re worth, here are some tips:

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What is Transaction Avoidance Syndrome? Part 2 of 3

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

A transaction is what happens at the end of a business exchange. The word comes from the Latin: trans- (“through”) and -agere (“to drive”).

As discussed in Part 1, many things can go wrong when we exchange payment for a service or product. A lot of us feel an underlying discomfort when we receive money.

This discomfort can look harmless at first. As a practitioner, you might spend “a few extra minutes” with each patient, or put off discussing payment options until the end of the visit. But the subconscious avoidance can have a very damaging effect on our business profitability.

Let’s take a look at why this happens.

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10 Reasons Naturopathic Doctors are Awesome [Video]

What is so great about naturopathic doctors? Well, I’m glad you asked, because I want to share 10 things I like the most about NDs.

As a consultant to natural health practice owners, and a former Risk Officer and data management specialist, I have observed the good and the bad in healthcare facilities around the US. Here is my perspective.

Watch this video, or continue reading below.

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Yin and Yang Approaches to Management

Balance is very difficult for leaders. When things go wrong, many of us find it hard to stay calm, cool, and collected.

Leaders are expected to meet objectives, yet also be approachable. To maintain control, but welcome differing opinions. To motivate staff, yet manage ongoing risks.

A few years ago, I was hired as director at a healthcare facility in Minnesota. It was a perfect fit for my experience and training. The leadership team was encouraging, as were the members of my department. And I really loved being in a long-term care environment.

But despite all the support, I found myself increasingly stressed and anxious. The problem wasn’t just the high-pressure environment; instead, it was a battle happening in my mind. As an introvert, I do my best work in periods of silence and reflection. My information-gathering process is intuitive, because I rely on connections between things that are not obvious to others. Rather than following a specific pathway, I look for hidden clues and investigate the root causes of problems. My process may be unconventional, but it gets results.

Unfortunately, executive roles typically do not welcome an intuitive thinking process. And this clash — between my natural temperament, and a system that rewards fast and decisive action — resulted in a very high-stress environment.

I wondered:

Why was it so difficult for intuitive leaders to fit the mold of traditional corporate thinking?

and

Is it possible to find a balanced leadership style?

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